Building A Modern Shed – Part 12 – Installing the Doors

In this article we’ll take a look at the different steps necessary to install a outswing double door that does not have a new construction fin, some tips for painting the door and necessary finishing touches. I had a hard time finding material on how to do this install. Throughout this article you’ll see videos that helped with a certain step and links at the end to articles and PDFs.

The video below will give you an overview of the process.

Verifying and Modifying the Rough Opening

Make sure the rough opening is plumb and square.  Measure out the rough opening to make sure it’s square. Measuring diagonally will tell you how close to square you are. It’s easier with a friend by the way.

You can check for plumb with a level.

Measuring and Checking the Rough Door Opening
Measuring and Checking the Rough Door Opening

Also, measure the door to make sure it is ½ -¾ inch smaller than the rough opening.

Measuring the Door for Bottom and Top Fit
Measuring the Door for Bottom and Top Fit
Measuring the Sides of the Rough Opening for Door Fit
Measuring the Sides of the Rough Opening for Door Fit

My door is 80 ½ inches tall and the rough opening was 82 inches.  Manufacturer’s instructions recommends a 3/8 – 1/2 inch gap at the top.  I used layers of OSB leftover from other parts of the build to reduce the gap to right around 81 inches.

Cutting OSB for Layering to Reduce the Gap in the Rough Opening
Cutting OSB for Layering to Reduce the Gap in the Rough Opening
Layering Scrap OSB to Meet the Required Gap for Installation
Layering Scrap OSB to Meet the Required Gap for Installation

Installing the Sill Pan

There are a couple of ways you can make your own sill pan but I ended up purchasing one made from high impact ABS plastic.

Jamsill ABS Door Pan Flashing
Jamsill ABS Door Pan Flashing

Fitting the Sill Pan

Put the corners from the kit in place.

Putting the Corners of the Sill Pan in Place to Measure the Center
Putting the Corners of the Sill Pan in Place to Measure the Center
Measuring the Distance to Cut the Center Sill Pan Piece
Measuring the Distance to Cut the Center Sill Pan Piece

Make sure to measure twice. You only get one cut with this.

Cutting the Center Piece of the Sill Pan to Fit
Cutting the Center Piece of the Sill Pan to Fit

Gluing the Sill Pan Together

Do a dry fit of everything before we glue up the sill pan.

Dry Fitting the Sill Pan
Dry Fitting the Sill Pan

Apply PVC Cement that comes with the kit to the recessed areas of the side pieces and the underside of the center piece where it overlaps the sides.

Applying PVC Cement to the Sides and the Center of the Sill Pan
Applying PVC Cement to the Sides and the Center of the Sill Pan
Clamping the Sill Pan Pieces Together While the PVC Glue Dries
Clamping the Sill Pan Pieces Together While the PVC Glue Dries

Finally Installing the Sill Pan

Apply 3 beads of silicon caulking to adhere the sill pan to the sill.

Apply 3 Beads of Silicon Caulk on the Rough Opening for the Sill Install
Apply 3 Beads of Silicon Caulk on the Rough Opening for the Sill Install

Press the sill pan into place.

Pressing the Sill Pan In Place
Pressing the Sill Pan In Place

Flashing the Sides of the Door Opening

If I used a water resistive barrier house wrap, like Tyvek, instead of treating the rigid foam as a WRB, there would be house wrap wrapped around to the inside of the rough opening.  To make up for this, we’re going to flash the sides.  Just like when we installed windows in the previous article, cut flashing the height of the door opening.

Measuring and Cutting Flashing for the Sides of the Rough Opening
Measuring and Cutting Flashing for the Sides of the Rough Opening

When you apply the flashing, make sure there is at least 2 inches of the flashing on the exterior.

Folding the Flashing on the Sides with 2 Inches on the Exterior
Folding the Flashing on the Sides with 2 Inches on the Exterior

Installing the Door

When I was researching how to install the door, I found this article by Fine Home Building to be very helpful.  What makes the door I purchased more of a pain to install is that it doesn’t have a fin on the exterior.  If I were to do this again, I would make sure the door has a fin, similar to the windows, even if I had to re-frame the opening to accommodate the different door.

Laying a Bead of Caulk on the Sill Pan

Right before you’re ready to install the door, lay a bead of caulk along the interior edge of the sill pan.  This will help with air infiltration.

Laying a Bead of Caulk Along the Interior Edge of the Sill Pan
Laying a Bead of Caulk Along the Interior Edge of the Sill Pan

We’re also going to apply a bead of caulk along the seams where the sill pan was glued for good measure.

Applying Caulk Along the Seams where the Sill Pan was Glued
Applying Caulk Along the Seams where the Sill Pan was Glued

Set the Door In-Place

Set the door in place, making sure the back of the door makes solid contact with the sealant we applied above.  This is where it gets a little tricky for me because my door doesn’t have fins to keep it flush with the exterior framing.  This is the time to call in your friends for help.

Setting the Door In Place Making Sure it is Seated Fully on the Sill Pan
Setting the Door In Place Making Sure it is Seated Fully on the Sill Pan

Shim the Door

Similar to installing the windows, it’s easier to share the videos that helped me.  The first one is installing a single door but provides good fundamentals.

This next one is good for understanding the gaps around the doors.

Just like when we were shimming the windows, take your time.  Double check that everything is level and plumb.  If it’s not, just loosen the screws and start again.

Driving Screws Tight after Checking for Plumb, Level and Spacing
Driving Screws Tight after Checking for Plumb, Level and Spacing
Replacing Hinge Screws with 3 inch Stainless Steel Screws
Replacing Hinge Screws with 3 inch Stainless Steel Screws
Cutting Shims
Cutting Shims

Install the Backer Rope and Seal the Outside

We’re going to use 1/2 inch backer rope, so we don’t have to fill the void between the door and rough opening with so much sealant.

Pushing Backer Rope into the Gap Between the Door and the Rough Opening
Pushing Backer Rope into the Gap Between the Door and the Rough Opening

Once that’s done, use some exterior grade sealant to fill the gap.

Sealing between the Door and Rough Opening with Exterior Grade Sealant
Sealing between the Door and Rough Opening with Exterior Grade Sealant

Making the Trim

The other trim around the windows is 1 1/4 inches in depth.  I want the trim around the door to mimic the windows but finding something premade that’s that depth is kind of a pain.  So, I’m using going to modify some 2×3 boards.  First cause their cheap and second cause their cheap.

The wood has a round over on the corners.  For our shed, I want sharper corners so I’m milling the wood on a tablesaw.

Milling 2x3 Lumber to 1 1/4 Inches Thick on the Tablesaw
Milling 2×3 Lumber to 1 1/4 Inches Thick on the Tablesaw

Modifying Trim to Fit the Door

Using a premade sill pan has caused the door to protrude about a 1/4 of an inch from being flush with the framing.  To compensate for this, I’m going to create a rabbet on the trim where it will overlap with the door frame.

Cutting a Rabbet where the Trim Sits on the Door Frame
Cutting a Rabbet where the Trim Sits on the Door Frame

I’m using a saw to do mine, but you could use a router if you had one.

The rabbet is cut so the trim will overlap the door frame about halfway making sure to keep a little space behind the hinge.

Prying up the Cut Section of the Rabbet
Prying up the Cut Section of the Rabbet

I’m pre-painting all sides of the board.  Even though we’ll caulk around the edges, this will help keep water from penetrating the wood if some gets behind it.

Pre-Painting All Sides of the Trim
Pre-Painting All Sides of the Trim

Install Trim Around the Door

Now it’s a matter of cutting the trim to fit and install it. For the corners, I’m just mitering them. I used screws to temporarily install the pieces to make sure they fit and then switched to nails.

Installing Trim around the Door Frame
Installing Trim around the Door Frame

I was using some nails that were 2 1/2 inches long at first, then I had an internal conversation and decided I didn’t want these ever coming off.  At that point, I swapped those out for some 4-inch galvanized nails.  Never coming off.

Installing Trim with Galvanized Nails
Installing Trim with Galvanized Nails

Caulking Around the Trim

To help combat water getting into the door area, we’ll caulk around the exterior and where the trim meets the door frame.  Remember to use an exterior rated caulk.

Caulking Around the Door Trim
Caulking Around the Door Trim

Painting the Doors

I did a two color paint job for the doors. White semi-gloss interior / exterior urethane alkyd enamel paint was used on the inside part of the door. For the exterior, I used Rustoleum Smoke Gray enamel paint.

To get started, we’ll need to loosen the security pin that is screwed in on the center of the hinges. Once this is done, the pins can be popped out and the doors removed.

Loosening the Security Pin on the Center of the Hinge
Loosening the Security Pin on the Center of the Hinge
Removing the Doors After the Pins have been Removed from the Hinges
Removing the Doors After the Pins have been Removed from the Hinges

Make it easy for yourself and remove the hinge and all the hardware from the door. Keep all the screws and hinges in a plastic bag so you don’t lose them.

Removing Hinges and Hardware from the Door Before Painting
Removing Hinges and Hardware from the Door Before Painting

I used a smooth foam roller to apply the white paint and a paint brush for the sides.

Using a Smooth Foam Roller to Roll On the White Alkali Paint
Using a Smooth Foam Roller to Roll On the White Urethane Alkali Enamel Paint

There was a series of painful events that were the reason it took me three tries to get the paint job done to my satisfaction. Well, I guess there is one silver lining is that you know if something like a fly lands on your paint and dies you just need to sand the surface till it’s smooth and paint again.

Fly that Died in the Paint as Soon as I Painted the Door
Fly that Died in the Paint as Soon as I Painted the Door

Before I get into the lessons, I used a Graco TrueCoat 360 DSP electric airless portable sprayer. I really like the sprayer for smaller jobs like this. Cleanup wasn’t that bad either.

Graco True Coat 360 Portable Paint Sprayer
Graco True Coat 360 DSP Airless Portable Paint Sprayer

Tips I Learned from Painting the Doors 3 Times

  1. If you’re using Rustoleum from a can, thin it just a little bit. I put in about a 1/3 of a cup of paint thinner in the 32oz. Graco Flexliner bag. So you don’t have to do the calculation with Google, that’s 1/3 cup of thinner to 4 cups of paint. The more viscous fluid allows you to lay down a thinner coat for faster drying and smooth finish.
  2. Start your paint sprayer on a lower setting and do some test runs.
  3. Spray the paint with the doors laying flat. I didn’t do that for the first coat and didn’t do tip #1. I immediately saw paint building up and moving.
  4. Protect your paint project while it dries. Make sure it has as little exposure to the elements as possible. If you can’t create a spray room like I did in the video, watch out for these things
    1. Sun. This accelerated the drying in one area on my door causing the paint to have a crackle affect.
    2. Night temperature fluctuations that cause condensation. Yes, that happened to me…..
    3. Wind. Try not to spray on a windy day.

Eventually I turned the inside of the shop into a spray booth with some plastic, thinned the paint and didn’t have a fly die on one of the doors.

Spraying Paint Inside the Shed
Spraying Paint Inside the Shed
Putting the Doors Back On After Painting Them
Putting the Doors Back On After Painting Them

Drilling the Secondary Door Bolts

The secondary door bolts are the sliding bolts that go into the door frame on the non primary door.

Security Door Bolt Similar to the Built in One on Our Door
Security Door Bolt Similar to the Built in One on Our Door
  • Make the door flush with the front edge
  • Mark the center of where the security pin touches the door frame
  • Drill the hole for the pin with a slightly larger drill bit.
Marking the Hole for the Security Bolt in the Secondary Door
Marking the Hole for the Security Bolt in the Secondary Door
Drilling the Hole for the Security Bolt in the Secondary Door
Drilling the Hole for the Security Bolt in the Secondary Door

Installing the Lockset

If you’ve been following this series, you know by this point that this project is no longer just a shed to throw a lawnmower in. This will eventually be a focal point in the backyard and a selling feature for our house eventually. Because of this, we chose a more modern and not so cheap lockset.

Double Door Handlset Keyed Entry Handle and Dummy Handlset
Double Door Handlset Keyed Entry Handle and Dummy Handlset

What I liked about this lockset is the plate backing on the front and large square surround on the inside pieces. These features would allow me a little fudge factor.

Depending on your lockset, you’ll need to drill some holes. The kit will come with a template for this. The most time consuming piece for me was aligning the template with the predrilled holes on the doors.

Hole Template for the Lockset
Hole Template for the Lockset

It was really nerve wracking drilling the holes for the deadbolt area. What made it easier was the Ryobi lockset drill guide. All I can say is measure a whole bunch of times and take your time.

Ryobi Lockset Guide for Drilling Holes
Ryobi Lockset Guide for Drilling Holes

My door didn’t have a traditional striker plate area. The secondary door has an aluminum piece that is the length of the door. This is where the latch snaps into. I had to modify this area to get the latch to close effortlessly.

Modifying the Aluminum Door Piece so the Lockset Latches Easily
Modifying the Aluminum Door Piece so the Lockset Latches Easily

I had to do the same thing for the deadbolt area along with drilling the side of the door with a forsner bit. It’s not necessary to drill any deeper than needed for the deadbolt to catch.

Drilling the Deadbolt Latch Hole with a Forsner Bit
Drilling the Deadbolt Latch Hole with a Forsner Bit
Drilling for Dummy Deadbolt
Drilling for Dummy Deadbolt
Using a Level to Make Sure the Lockset is Even
Using a Level to Make Sure the Lockset is Even

Installing the Drip Edge Above the Door

The last thing to do is install a drip edge over the trim. This will help with water getting behind the trim and into the door frame.

Measuring Above the Top Trim for the Drip Edge
Measuring Above the Top Trim for the Drip Edge

The drip edge is a 1 1/2 inch x 1 1/2 inch piece of drip edge flashing. Use roofing nails to install it. When you nail it in place, nail in the top third of the flashing.

Using Roof Nails in the Top Third of the Flashing to Install the Flashing
Using Roof Nails in the Top Third of the Flashing to Install the Flashing

Costs

Door Installation Costs
Door Installation Costs

This part of the project cost $1,063.85 bringing the project total to $4,925.74. There are a couple of small items that need to be done before the siding can be put on. If you want content like this sent to your inbox when it’s available, please subscribe using the subscribe now area at the top right.

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