Library Popcorn Ceiling Removal – Spraying Texture

Warning: There is a chance that popcorn ceilings can contain asbestos. If there is any doubt you should use a asbestos services professional to test for it.

This is the final installment of what it took to remove and re-texture the ceiling in our library. The previous posts covered the preparation and removal of the old popcorn ceiling.

Supplies:

  • Sprayer and hopper
  • Box of joint compound (green box – topping compound)
  • Air compressor
  • Air compressor hose
  • Respirator

All the support equipment was staged before mixing the joint compound for spraying. I have a little pancake air compressor, 50 feet of hose and respirator that was positioned close to the opening of the room.

Pancake Air Compressor
Pancake Air Compressor

Unless you want to cough up texture particles at night, the respirator is a necessity.

Paint Respirator
Paint Respirator

Once the equipment was in place it was time to think about getting the ceiling texture resources ready. There are three main variables to think about when spraying ceiling texture:

  • Consistency of joint compound (how thick it is)
  • Nozzle size on the sprayer
  • Air pressure from the compressor

First thing to do was mix the joint compound. For my application, I was looking for pancake batter consistency.

Topping Joint Compound
Topping Joint Compound (the green box)

One thing I learned from previously doing this is to mix half bucket batches. It’s much easier to maintain consistency in smaller batches. I used a rinsed out old bucket to mix the compound in. Using a corded drill with the paint stirrer sped up the joint compound mixing. Be mindful of your paint mixer if its plastic. Mine came right off the metal rod once.

Joint Compound To Mix
Joint Compound To Mix
Paint Mixer
Paint Mixer On A Corded Drill

For my application I used the medium nozzle on the texture hopper. Obviously the bigger the nozzle opening, the larger the texture is on the ceiling or walls.

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Texture Hopper

Texture Hopper

 

Last part of the sprayer setup was to set the psi on the compressor to 25 psi. The more pressure coming from the compressor, the finer the texture that will be sprayed.

When spraying for the first time pick a small spot to test on, and adjust as needed. I made sure to spray in overlapping strokes in a 5′ length section. One thing I’ve learned is to not be stingy with the texture. Those two things will kept me from having to go back and touch up spots.

 

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Ceiling Texture Close Up

Ceiling Texture Close Up

 

I ended up using the whole box of joint compound for the approximately 10′ x 15′ room, and it took about 45 minutes to spray the texture. This included going back and mixing another batch of compound.

 

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Textured Room

Textured Room

 

Clean up was a matter of taking down the plastic on the wall.

 

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Fold Plastic On To Itself for Clean Up

Fold Plastic On To Itself for Clean Up

 

The only thing left was to wait for the ceiling to dry, prime and paint it.[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

7 thoughts on “Library Popcorn Ceiling Removal – Spraying Texture”

  1. Hi,

    Was hoping to get an idea of how much water to join compound you used. I get the description Pancake Batter but is it around 3 to 1?

    thanks, Ed

  2. 3 part joint compound to 1 part water sounds about right. I started by adding half the water I thought I would need, mix and added some more water if necessary.

    As long as your mixing in small batches, its easy to fix a too thin, too thick mixture.

  3. Hi DiyGuy,
    You just used joint coupound for this? I have to blend 13′ x 4′ patch of new ceiling that was water damaged and want to do myself. Do you recommend USG medium texture topping at all or simply the topping compound, which I assume is a lighter variant of regular taping mud.

  4. can you mix paint in with the compound while you are spraying the ceiling? Then you dont need to paint afterwards

  5. That’s an interesting idea. I know that Behr used to make a paint mixture that had sand in it you could apply to a ceiling. The only thing that keeps coming to mind is the amount of primer the topping compound sucks up when you paint. If you decide to experiment, just do it in a small batch and try to measure out quantities you use. That way when you try to recreate it on a larger scale you aren’t trying to wing it. Also, keep in mind the paint will replace the water when thinning down the topping compound.

  6. Thanks. I still have a really tall two story ceiling that I’ve been putting off doing. I’ll have to try adding an additive then.

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